Winter Wassail Recipe

Today is the winter seasonal self care class at OhmMother Yoga. When I posted asking what people would prefer for our seasonal treat many of you had never heard of wassail so I wanted to make sure to get the recipe up if you want to make some at home whether you made it to class or not. I used a recipe from a spicy perspective for a slow cooker wassail but there are so many variations. I halved the original recipe and added a little water so its not quite as sweet.

What you need:

64 oz spiced cider (I got mine from trader joes)

2 cups orange juice

5 cinnamon sticks

1/2 teaspoon whole cloves

2 bags of hibiscus tea

1 inch peeled and sliced fresh ginger

1 apple sliced

1 orange sliced

Add all ingredients to slow cooker and cook on high for 3-4 hours. Add a few cups of water or to taste or not at all depending on your preference.

See you in a couple of hours!

Reflections on the Yoga Challenge

I wanted to follow up and see how you are feeling after last week and taking a minute for yourself to do constructive rest pose. Were you able to do it? How did it impact your days? I thought I would share my thoughts.

Constructive Rest Pose

I found it really hard to fit doing 1 minute of yoga into the middle of my day really hard because of kids and general running around. I found my groove at bath time. Bed time is the hardest part of my day because I’m just ready to check out for a minute after a busy day of running around. There are many nights I creep out of quiet bedrooms with regret knowing the last thing my kids heard was a rushed good night or go to sleep!

After stalling shaninigans. I found setting them up in the bath tub to play while I rested in constructive rest pose in the hall way while able to be at arms reach and hearing distance or having my husband do bath time helped me settle for the day and enjoy the joy filled banter coming from the bath tub. It gave me a recharge to mindfully work through the bed time routine without as much frustration and then when I could “clock out” for the evening I already felt settled and ready for it.

The one big insight I got from simply resting for a few moments in this way is that I could listen to my body. At first it was screaming at me that it needed more rest and I was able to get the message. The second big insight I got that has become my mantra is there is enough time to get done all I need to do. Its so easy to get overwhelmed by those long never ending do to lists but staying present and slowing down somehow creates MORE time. So if you haven’t been able to commit 1-3 minutes to yourself maybe this might help. Really find that time, I promise its worth it!

I’d love to know what your experience was like, share it here or on the facebook page and I’ll see you at the December Seasonal Self Care Class at OhmMother Yoga, there are 2 spots left. ūüėČ

Winter Self Care Challenge

The winter seasonal self care class is approaching quickly (on December 17th at OhmMother Yoga) but that doesn’t mean we have to wait until then to take care of ourselves.

December can be a busy month for so many people so I wanted to invite you to s.l.o.w down with me. If you are coming to class consider it homework because I want to know about your experience.

Here’s the challenge.

Commit to yourself to do 1, 3, or 5 minutes of constructive rest pose every day. If you can do it sometime between 3-7 that is ideal but if that doesn’t work pick any time especially a time that you can make this challenge successful. Now go to the alarm app on your phone and set a self care alarm so you won’t forget! ūüėČ

While you rest in this pose I want you to simply listen to what your body is telling you. Then when your time is up continue on your day and observe how you feel. Share your constructive rest pose pictures or check in when you practice your self care on facebook or IG with hashtag #selfcarewithsarah Here’s more info on constructive rest pose.

Constructive Rest Pose

Lay face up

Arms at your sides, hands far enough away that palms rest comfortably up

Feet shoulder width apart, toes turn in allowing knees and thighs to rest against each other

 

 

Fire Cider

I was inspired to give you a short video about ways you can take fire cider this fall but my ancient iPhone didn’t give much volume and you can’t really hear. It made me think- how do you best take in info? Do you prefer a blog post, a video, a podcast? Let me know!

As I was straining off my fire cider this morning it gave me lots of inspiration that I thought I would share with you. Here’s some quick down and dirty bullet points.

  • take 1 tablespoon a day to keep the sickies away (mix with honey if you prefer)
  • if you have chills and a fever add some honey and cayenne pepper and take every hour, take a nice hot bath and wrap yourself up in wooly socks and blankets until you sweat the yuck out
  • use as a marinade
  • make a “lemonade” to give to your kids, I do 1/2 of a lemon squeezed, 1 teaspoon of honey in 1 cup of warm water to dissolve the honey and a teaspoon of fire cider. You can add extra cold water if your kids don’t like warm drinks. The sweet helps to hide some of the sour of the vinegar.
  • take the strained off veggies and add to a pot of bones to make stock
  • add 2 tablespoons to stock when you start cooking to aid in getting more marrow out of the bones
  • add a tablespoon or 2 to soup right before you eat it for a tangy flavor

What do you think? How do you like your fire cider best?

Fall Self Care Package Recipes

Fire Cider
Fire Cider was originally developed by Rosemary Gladstar in the early 80s. This recipe does not contain cayenne pepper so its a little milder if giving to children. You can add it in if you want the extra heat.
You can take 1-3 Tablespoons a day as prevention or up to 1 tablespoon an hour if you are trying to ward off a cold. Dilute with a little water and add honey to taste.
To make more at home:
1 cup minced yellow onion
1/2 cup chopped horseradish (I got at miejer in the produce section)
15 cloves minced garlic
one small knob of ginger chopped
2-3 black peppercorns
1/2 lemon sliced thin
3 cups of apple cider vinegar with the mother
Add your ingredients to a glass jar and cover with vinegar. Stir well and let sit 2-3 weeks shaking the jar once a day for the first few days.
Strain out the vinegar, refrigerate and use within a year.
Your fire cider was mixed on Friday Oct 13 so you can strain in 2 or 3 weeks whenever you prefer. You can add honey to the vinegar or just add the honey when you use it. Add 1/4 c honey if you choose to add to vinegar.
Huang Qi Chai
Isn’t that fun to say? This is an immune boosting chair recipe with no caffeine created by Rosalee De la Foret. You can drink it as is, or add a black tea bag if you’re more traditional. I like mine with some coconut milk and honey and an extra sprinkle of cinnamon on top. Your tea bags have powdered ginger and you might like to add a few slices of fresh ginger when you brew yours at home.
10 small slices of astragalus root (huang qi) you can buy online or in herb shops
1 tablespoon dried orange peel
2 teaspoons minced or fresh ginger
1/2 tablespoon cinnamon chips (the sticks work too or even powdered)
1/2 teaspoon whole black peppercorns
3 cardamom pods (powder works too)
2 whole cloves
On stove top add all ingredients to pan with 4 cups of water. Bring to a boil, reduce heat and simmer for 20 minutes covered. Strain and add milk and honey as desired. Drink within 36 hours
Slow cooker method: Place all ingredients with water in a slow cooker on low heat overnight covered. If water looks low add more. Strain and drink how you like.
Dry brushing is great to do as a fall ritual. I like to do it right before a shower.
Here is some info for dry brushing as well. http://www.sarahcanga.com/2014/09/25/natural-remedy-for-dryness/

Seasonal Self Care for Fall: Lung and Large Intestine

The fall is the time when the lung and large intestine system is most active in Chinese Medicine. Fall is a time of beginning to turn inward, gathering and consolidating after all of the abundant energy available in summer. The Lung and Large intestine system relate to the color white, pungent flavor, the pathogen of dryness, the element of metal, skin and hair, the nose and the emotion of grief.

If we look to the environment we can see how the energy around us is consolidating. The plants in our gardens are turning yellow, drying up and becoming smaller. The leaves of the trees are starting to change color. For many trees the color change starts at the top of the tree and slowly moves down just like the energy of the season. We are moving from the abundance of yang energy of summer to the inner contemplation and rest of winter.

Natural Remedy for Dryness

Just like in Western medicine the lungs is related to respiration. The lungs take in oxygen and qi from the environment and expel waste from the interior of the body. This is known as “getting rid of the stale and taking in the fresh”.

Change Your Breath, Change Your Mood

The energy we take in from breathing is mixed with the food and water we consume to form the qi used for the functions of the body. Just like the quality of food and water you eat and drink is important so is the quality of air you breathe as well as how you breathe. The breath is one of the few processes in the body that is under both conscious and unconscious control. In yoga we breathe in through the nose and out through the nose as the body was anatomically designed for. To take the body out of fight or flight we can exhale longer than we inhale calming the nervous system.

The skin of the body is considered the first line of defense from external pathogens. The “wei qi” is the energy of the body that defends against those pathogens. This is achieved through the opening and closing of the pores. The lung is considered a delicate organ and is easily susceptible to attack. Dressing for the season is important and especially keeping the neck covered to prevent a wind attack which can quickly turn into a stiff neck, sore throat, runny nose etc. The skin has the job of distributing qi and controlling respiration as well.

The lung also assists in regulating the water passages and plays a role in the body’s ability to sweat. When imbalanced this can cause spontaneous sweating, or the inability to sweat.

The lung meridian passes through the throat affecting our speech either in the quality of voice or in the case of grief using our voice, expressing grief in a healthy way etc.

Fall Breathing 5 Minute Meditation

Grief

According to Paul Pitchford in Healing with Whole Foods the personality of those with strong lungs is influenced by this qi: they appear unified, hold onto their direction, create order, and are effective at what they do. How well we “hold on” and “let go” can be expressed in terms of emotional attachment. The large intestine is the yang organ paired with the lung and its obvious function is releasing what is no longer needed. In Chinese Medicine this is emotional and physical.

Grief that is expressed and resolved strengthens the internal basis of health, repressed grief causes long term contraction of the lungs. Lung and large intestine disharmonies regardless of source usually have a root cause of unresolved sadness that needs to be cleared.

Grief and the energy of fall is contracting in nature, if used constructively it can clear repression. This is an emotion and time of year that invites us to look within and identify unresolved pain. Mindfulness gives way to resolution. Using the breath especially long deep breathing helps to clear these emotions and thoughts. It is also interesting to note that lung and colon cancer are very prevelant in our culture.

A note on getting sick. Getting sick a couple times a year can actually be a way for your body to expel toxic build up in the body not a sign that you are unwell. Just like with grief if it important to be mindful of your body during times of illness. Take the time to rest and recover when you get sick to lessen the duration and severity of illness. (get some acupuncture to boost the immune system or just at the onset to assist in a quick resolution)

Meditation for Grief

A Ritual for Letting Go

Nutrition

Pungent is the flavor of fall and can be used for both cleansing and protection. Hot peppers and chiles are pungent in flavor and cause the body to sweat, a great example of how all the associations of the lung are tied together. White pungent foods are most specific to the lungs especially in the onion family and garlic. Turnip, ginger, horseradish, cabbage, radish, daikon radish and white peppercorn. Seaweeds, marshmallow root, flaxseed and fenugreek help to clear excess mucus and replace it with a healthy mucus lining in the body.

Foods high in beta carotene appear to protect the lungs and large intestine against cancer. Some examples include: carrot, winter squash, pumpkin, broccoli, parsley, kale, mustard greens, watercress, wheat or barely grass, common green, blue-green, or golden algae.

Green foods improve digestion of proteins and fats and inhibit viruses as well as aid the body in clearing residues of environmental pollution from fumes, coal dust, smoke etc. Many dark leafy greens look like lungs especially spinach and chard and are especially helpful. Greens also help to clear phlegm in the body.

Adding fiber to the diet is also beneficial in cleansing the lungs and large intestine. Apples, pears, cherries, carrots, oats help to clear cholesterol from the digestive tract. In the fall it is especially benefical to eat these foods cooked.

You will notice that the foods for the fall are also those that are also in season for the fall.

Recipes

Healthy Fall Dessert: Caramel Apple Crisp with Nuts

Perfect Breakfast Recipe for Fall: Oatmeal Waffles

Roasted Red Pepper Chili with Zucchini and Quinoa

 

Acupuncture

The points used for class are part of Miriam Lee’s Great 10 protocol. Miriam Lee was an important contributor to acupuncture in the United States and would treat up to 18 people an hour. She developed this protocol that could treat virtually any disharmony. Consequently the points we are using fall on the lung and large intestine channels and it is thought that the lung qi is the weakest in modern people.

Li4 also known as the headache point. It is the command point for the head and face meaning that it can be used for any issue involving the head and face eyes, ears, nose, mouth etc. It is also used to treat colds, excessive sweating, red eyes, toothache,¬† nosebleed, loss of voice, sore throat, amenorrhea, prolonged labor, rashes, pain in the body. One of my teachers would say this point is the body’s natural advil.

Li11 According to Insights of a Senoir Acupuncturist current research in China has found that stimulating this point increases white blood cells, this increasing immune function and providing antibiotic and antiinflammtory action. It is used to treat fever, sore throat, loss of voice, toothache, dizziness, hypertension, urticarial, rash, dry skin, shingles, abdomen pain, numbness of the arm, pain of the elbow and ankle.

Lu7 is used to treat chills and fever, nasal congestion, cough, wheezing, shortness of breath, headache, stiff neck, hot or painful urination, poor memory, palpitations, weakness and pain of wrist, clears heaviness and oppression of the chest.

Seasonal Self Care for Late Summer Acupressure and Moxabustion

It seemed only fitting to use the 2 most tonifying points for the spleen/stomach system this season: Sp6 and St36. As we explored in class there are a variety of ways to stimulate these points to strengthen our center whether it be through pressure from seeds, our fingers, the heat of moxa or acupuncture needles. Here are some benefits of these points and a reminder on how to find them.

smokeless moxa over SP6 for premenstrual cramps

SP6 SANYINJAO “3 yin intersection”

This acu-point is named 3 yin intersection because the 3 yin channels of the leg (liver, spleen, and kidney) converge on this point. Because of this meeting place all three of these organs are stimulated when this point is used. This point is used for a variety of ailments and is considered a primary point for digestive, gynaecological, sexual, urinary and emotional disorders. Sp6 is considered to be one of the most important points to harmonize and cool the blood as well as to invigorate circulation. This point is contraindicated during pregnancy due to its ability to assist the body with labor both by encouraging efficient contractions and reducing the pain of said contractions.

To find this point rest your pinky on the highest point of the body protruburance on the inside of the ankle, find the tender spot where your index finger rests in the depression close to the tibia bone.

ST37 ZUSANLI “leg 3 miles”

This acu-point is named leg 3 miles because soldier would burn moxa over it to give them endurance to march 3 more miles. St36 is also the command point of the abdomen and so it is useful for anything relating to the stomach and digestion. Qin Cheng-zu of the song dynasty went a step further and said that with this point “all diseases can be treated.” This point is the most important point to stimulate the spleen and stomach to build qi and blood. St36 also works to harmonize the stomach, tonify the spleen, nourish blood and yin, clear fire, calm the spirit and resolve dampness.

You can find this point by placing your 4 fingers under the knee cap and then pressing in one finger breadth lateral to the tibia.

If using acupressure gently press into these points for 1-3 minutes on each side. If applying moxa hold the moxa stick above the point until you feel the warmth of the moxa on your skin. Use a pecking motion so the skin does not become too hot. When the point feels warm appx 5-10 minutes change sides. This is a great practice at the change of the seasons to keep the body strong.

When doing moxa make sure to be in an open or well ventilated space. The stick may be reused if stamped out without water after use. Store only after it has cooled and is no longer smoking.

Never do moxa without the guidance of a trained and licensed acupuncturist.

While acupressure is powerful it is important to make sure you are working with a licensed and trained medicine professional and is not a replacement for medical care.

Seasonal Self Care for Late Summer: Spleen, Damp, Worry and Transitions

Calendula

The spleen and stomach system relate to the season of late summer, approximately the last month of summer time as well as the last 18 days or so of each season when we are slowly but surely becoming the next season. Because of this and the other functions of the spleen system it is closely tied with transitions environmentally, energetically, emotionally, and physically. In class we explored the breath and the space between the inhalations and exhalations, the place where one becomes the next.

Here is the quick reference for the spleen system:

Element: Earth                    Color: Yellow

Taste: Sweet                         Emotion: Overthinking/Worry

Opens to: Mouth                 Manifests on: Lips                            Controls: Muscles and extremities

The main function of the Spleen system is to transport and transform the food we eat. When you think of the spleen/stomach it is easy to think about digestion. This system takes the food we consume and transforms it into usable energy then takes it where the body needs it so it can be used. Digestion and absorption is all about the spleen. The spleen also plays a role in overseeing the water in our bodies as well making sure it is where it needs to be and taking it away from where it doesn’t belong. The pathogen of the spleen is dampness. If you’ve ever been outside on a damp day you can feel it in your body in a distinct way. People who have spleen imbalance can be very sensitive to this kind of weather. Other examples of dampness in the body include pain that is worse in damp weather, heavy achy limbs, edema, diarrhea, phlegm, and retained fluid.

The spleen also controls the blood. While the heart pumps the blood throughout the body and the liver stores it at rest the spleen makes sure the blood is contained where it is supposed to be. When the spleen is weak you may experience bleeding because of this such as spotting in between periods, long or heavy periods, nose bleeds etc

The spleen also controls the muscles and limbs and containment is involved here as well. Healthy muscles are those that contract when used and relax at rest. When the spleen is weak the muscles will be weak and the skin flabby. Malnourishment or excessive consumption of processed foods can cause this weakness in the body as well. Energetically the spleen moves upwards, when this energy is weak it can cause issues with the muscles such as prolapse of the uterus, rectum or other internal organs.

The spleen manifests on the lips. When the lips are soft, red and full it indicates the health of the spleen energy. When pale, dry or thin this can indicate issues or depletion of the spleen energy.

The taste of the spleen is sweet but not the way you might associate this flavor with. Full sweet flavor comes from root vegetables like sweet potatoes, carrots, yams, beets, wheat, sweet peppers, corn, squashes etc Because the spleen is essentially a part of all seasons as the space between one and the next you can think of spleen foods as the foundations of your diet. Many orange and yellow foods are great first foods for babies when introducing solids because they are easy to digest.

The color of the season is yellow and it is easy to see why. Look around outside and everywhere you look there is vibrant yellow. The fields are golden, the flowers are yellow and even some dried leaves are yellow in color. Eating foods that are yellow are also beneficial to the spleen system.

The emotion is worry or overthinking. I can imagine when we depended on growing our own food how this season could be a time of worry. Did the crops yield enough to sell and hold us over winter? Would the coming winter be a rough one? In modern times we damage our spleen energy with multi-tasking. The spleen has many jobs but it is important to take it one step at a time. One way to protect your spleen is to make meal time your one and only priority. Turn the television off, put your smart phone in another room and enjoy the aromas and delicious sight of your foods. Chew thoroughly before taking another bite, putting your fork down in between tastes and enjoy good company and conversation.

If you find yourself in a state of ruminating and can’t get your mind to get off the hamster wheel the best way to clear your mind is to do movement where your opposite hand moves with your opposite foot. Walking is a perfect example of this and even simply walking in place can help especially if your thoughts start up when you’re trying to sleep.

Here are some spleen recipes:

Golden Milk, a spleen tonic

Green Lentil Curry

Mindful Eating for Thanksgiving

Roasted Red Pepper Chili with Zucchini and Quinoa

Southwestern Stuffed Acorn Squash

Coconut Lime Butternut Squash Soup

Cheesy Pesto Chicken Lasagna Stuffed Spaghetti Squash

http://www.food.com/recipe/black-bean-and-sweet-potato-chili-vegetarian-408973

Savory Pumpkin and Feta Muffins

Butternut Squash Lasagna with Tomato Basil Chicken Sausage

The color of the season is yellow and it is easy to see why. Look around outside and everywhere you look there is vibrant yellow. The fields are golden, the flowers are yellow and even some dried leaves are yellow in color. Eating foods that are yellow are also beneficial to the spleen system.

 

 

Seasonal Self Care for Late Summer (yoga)

The focus of our yoga practice this season is about finding equilibrium during times of transition. In each pose be mindful of your breath especially in the spaces between the inhale and exhale, the place of becoming. That’s what this season is all about. We do a series of postures in different ways to explore how it feels and which feel best for right now. The intention is to bring these postures into your daily practice however they feel best. Remember especially if you are short on time to pick 2 poses to practice everyday, the one from class you liked best and the one you liked least. ūüėČ Let’s begin.

Qi Gong

 

 

Wide Mountain Twist

Stand with feet shoulder width apart or wider. Feel how your feet make contact with the ground. Inhale arms to T exhale twist upper body to the right keeping hips square. Move with breath inhaling to center and exhaling to twist noting the space between each inhale and exhale. Repeat 3 times on each side and return to wide mountain to observe body for 3 breaths.

Standing with wide legs march in place for 3 breath cycles.

Closed leg mountain 

Standing with big toes touching and outer feet parallel inhale finger tips to shoulders exhale releasing shoulders down. Inhale lengthen spine and exhale twist. Repeat on opposite side. Do 3 rounds o each side.

 

With feet together march in place for 3 breath cycles.

Mountain Pose

Bring feet hip width apart. Inhale arms to cactus, exhale twist. Repeat other side. Do 3 rounds, return to center and observe for 3 breaths.

Repeat one more round of standing mountain twist which ever feet and arm combination felt best in your body.

With feet hip distance apart march in place for 3 breath cycles.

Mahasirs Mudra

Curl ring finger into palm and bring middle and index finger to touch thumb. Keep pinky extended and rest back of hands on thighs or knees. This mudra can help with clearing congestion and headaches especially when caused by weather changes. It also can help when we are spending too much time in our heads. Rest in this mudra for 3-6 minutes spending time observing your breath allowing for the spaces between your inhalations and exhalations to comfortably lengthen.

Acupressure SP6 & ST36

Bridge wide legged

Place feet shoulder width apart keeping knees and feet parallel. Arms are in a wide “V”, shoulders and neck are relaxed. Take a deep breath and feel the pause, with the exhale lift the hips off of the ground and hold for 3 breaths. Inhale and release, exhale and allow the body to soften. Repeat 3 times.

Low Twist

Lie on your back, knees bent feet on the floor. Bring arms to a “T”. With an exhale drop knees to right with knees pointing down and away from the body. If you feel any tightness in the hips of knees elevate the left thigh/knee with a¬†blanket or block. If you want to go deeper into the twist turn the head to the¬†left. Take 3 deep breaths. Lift right leg and then left back to center when you are finished. Repeat on the left.¬†¬†

Bridge feet together

Thighs, knees and feet touching and arms close to body. Inhale, pause and exhale lift hips into bridge. Slide shoulders down and slide arms toward midline. Take 3 breath cycles and release. Observe effects of pose.

Twist II

Take a deep breath and as you exhale drop knees to the right bringing the thighs parallel with right arm. If any tightness is felt place a blanket or block under your right thigh. To go deeper turn head to the left. Both shoulders should be resting comfortably on the ground. Take 3 deep breaths, observing the gentle squeeze of the internal organs as you exhale.

Bridge Pose

Bring feet hip distance apart for this bridge pose. You can place a block inbetween your thighs. Three breath cycles

Twist Up

Arms in T, exhale knees into chest. Inhale pause, exhale drop knees to right with the knees pointing up to the arm pit/shoulder. Place a blanket or block under thigh for support if needed. Take 3 breaths. Pause in the center and Repeat on the left.

Supine Spleen Salutation

Start lying on your back, knees bent, feet hip width apart.

  1. Inhale
  2. exhale bridge pose
  3. inhale release
  4. exhale knees to chest arms up and over head
  5. inhale release arms at sides, extend legs up bent knees if need be
  6. exhale knees to chest
  7. inhale to starting point, do 3-5 rounds

Final relaxation 

Hold for 5-10 minutes in restorative pose of your choice

 

Late Summer Self Care Package Details

The late summer yogapuncture is in Crystal Lake on Friday September 15th at 7:15. If you’d like to join there are a few spots left. I am including a self care package that goes along with the theme of this yogapuncture and all of it relates to the spleen/stomach system in Chinese Medicine. The self care package is designed to assist you through out the season and hopefully give you a few new things you might not have tried before. Here are the 4 items that will be in this care package and what they are for. Since the spleen/stomach system’s main¬†job in Chinese Medicine is to “rot and ripen” our food both transforming and transporting the energy our body uses from the food we eat and the color associated with this system is yellow/orange it only felt fitting to include a few things that support digestion.

Trikatu pastilles

These are hand rolled “pills” of powdered ginger, peppercorn and long pepper with raw, local honey are part of Ayurvedic medicine (Chinese Medicine’s). These can be enjoyed before or after a meal to assist with digestion and are especially good if you have a tendency to run cold or struggle with gas and bloating.¬†Not sure if you run cold? If raw foods seem to give you an upset stomach that could be an indication of cold in your belly as one example. Black pepper is known to assist in the absorption rate of the foods it is paired with. These are especially helpful in the fall/winter seasons when the temperatures are colder.

Smokeless Moxa stick
Moxabustion is a preventative tool in Chinese Medicine. Mugwort a yellow spongy herb in the chrysanthemum family is heated over acupuncture points for a variety of ailments and also to aid the body in staying well. Instead of stimulating acu points with pressure or needles the warmth of the moxa stick held over acupuncture points helps to improve circulation and boost energy.¬†Because moxa can be a create a thick smoke smokeless moxa is used for the same benefit, its scent is similar to incense and does not linger as long as regular moxa. Instructions on how to use the moxa stick and which points to stimulate for fall will be included.¬†You will also get a chance to give it a try at the yogapuncture class. ūüôā
Belly Bag
This is a weighted bag filled with rice that can be heated or used “as is”.¬† Place over your abdomen to help facilitate deeper breathing and¬†connect with your center. A freeing sensation is often felt when the belly bag is removed after resting over the abdomen for a period of time and can help with managing stress combined with¬†deep breathing. We will also be using these in class also!
Golden Milk tonic concentrate

Golden milk includes turmeric and ginger (both are yellow/orange) which are helpful anti inflammatory herbs. This concentrate is homemade and takes the labor out of making your own golden milk at home. Drink daily for a boost of energy, to support your spleen/stomach system and reduce inflammation. It reminds me of a latte and feels cozy in your belly on a cool fall day without any of the guilt. This golden milk is also dairy and caffeine free.

If you would like a self care package let me know by next Wednesday Sept 13th. The cost is $35 I will only be making them to order this time.¬†They will be ready for class on next Friday and if you can’t make it to class I can mail to you or you can pick up by me.¬†If you have any questions please let me know!

See you Friday!